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Two Arrested for Killing and Eating a Park Swan

Two Arrested for Killing and Eating a Park Swan


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Two men were caught stealing a swan from a public park and eating it

Wikimedia/Trischa

Two men admitted to stealing and eating a black swan from a public park in Shanghai, but they threw the meat away because swan doesn't taste good.

People eat ducks and turkeys and chickens, but swans are not often on the menu. Two men recently decided to see for themselves if swans were actually edible, and now they’ve been arrested for stealing and eating one out of a Shanghai public park.

According to Shanghaiist, swans are a protected species in China, and Shanghai's Xujiahui Park normally has five black swans in residence to add ambience and romance to the park setting. Recently, however, one of the birds disappeared. When park employees checked security tapes to see what had happened to the bird, they were stunned to see two strange men grab a swan in the middle of the night and run away with it.

It turns out they were pretty easy to catch from the surveillance video, and when police found the men, the culprits admitted to stealing and eating the swan.

The swan thieves told police that they were initially in the park to catch fish, which is also illegal, but they were afraid of being caught by security. On their way on the run from the guards, they say they encountered a black swan and decided to grab it.

The men admitted to boiling the swan meat and eating it with some radishes, but they said that they found the taste of swan unappetizing and wound up throwing about half of it away.

Only eating half the swan will probably not get them leniency, though, and both have been arrested for hunting and killing a protected species.


Secret to killing milkweed aphids, not monarch butterfly eggs

Los Angeles reader Millicent Stoller wrote to our SoCal Garden Clinic saying she was trying to plant for monarch butterflies. Stoller said she was growing two milkweeds, but both had become inundated with aphids.

“When I try to eliminate the bugs with a water spray or a soap-water spray, I end up destroying butterfly eggs,” she wrote. “Is there another way?”

For an answer, we turned to Barbara Eisenstein, research associate at Rancho Santa Ana Botanic Garden in Claremont, founder and manager of a nature park stewardship program in South Pasadena and horticulture chairwoman for the San Gabriel Mountains Chapter of the California Native Plant Society.

The bright yellow aphids found on milkweeds are destructive, non-native pests. It is important to remove and dispose of them at first appearance or they will quickly infest the plant, making it difficult for monarchs to use the plant.

Monarch eggs are more tightly attached to leaves than aphids, so with just the right amount of pressure you may be able to wash off aphids without destroying the eggs.

Sprayed water may only dislodge the pests, which can climb back up on their own or be returned by aphid-harvesting ants. Soapy water may dislodge and kill more aphids, but it also is more damaging to the monarchs and can build up on the plant.

Though tedious, dabbing aphids with cotton swabs dipped in isopropyl (rubbing) alcohol is most effective. That kills them outright. Alcohol, however, also is lethal to monarch eggs and larvae, so care must be taken when dabbing.

Natural controls for the pests, sometimes called oleander aphids, include the ladybug, especially in the larval stage, as well as the lacewing, syrphid fly larvae and the tiny wasp Lysiphlebus testaceipes. Some of these are available in stores and online.


Secret to killing milkweed aphids, not monarch butterfly eggs

Los Angeles reader Millicent Stoller wrote to our SoCal Garden Clinic saying she was trying to plant for monarch butterflies. Stoller said she was growing two milkweeds, but both had become inundated with aphids.

“When I try to eliminate the bugs with a water spray or a soap-water spray, I end up destroying butterfly eggs,” she wrote. “Is there another way?”

For an answer, we turned to Barbara Eisenstein, research associate at Rancho Santa Ana Botanic Garden in Claremont, founder and manager of a nature park stewardship program in South Pasadena and horticulture chairwoman for the San Gabriel Mountains Chapter of the California Native Plant Society.

The bright yellow aphids found on milkweeds are destructive, non-native pests. It is important to remove and dispose of them at first appearance or they will quickly infest the plant, making it difficult for monarchs to use the plant.

Monarch eggs are more tightly attached to leaves than aphids, so with just the right amount of pressure you may be able to wash off aphids without destroying the eggs.

Sprayed water may only dislodge the pests, which can climb back up on their own or be returned by aphid-harvesting ants. Soapy water may dislodge and kill more aphids, but it also is more damaging to the monarchs and can build up on the plant.

Though tedious, dabbing aphids with cotton swabs dipped in isopropyl (rubbing) alcohol is most effective. That kills them outright. Alcohol, however, also is lethal to monarch eggs and larvae, so care must be taken when dabbing.

Natural controls for the pests, sometimes called oleander aphids, include the ladybug, especially in the larval stage, as well as the lacewing, syrphid fly larvae and the tiny wasp Lysiphlebus testaceipes. Some of these are available in stores and online.


Secret to killing milkweed aphids, not monarch butterfly eggs

Los Angeles reader Millicent Stoller wrote to our SoCal Garden Clinic saying she was trying to plant for monarch butterflies. Stoller said she was growing two milkweeds, but both had become inundated with aphids.

“When I try to eliminate the bugs with a water spray or a soap-water spray, I end up destroying butterfly eggs,” she wrote. “Is there another way?”

For an answer, we turned to Barbara Eisenstein, research associate at Rancho Santa Ana Botanic Garden in Claremont, founder and manager of a nature park stewardship program in South Pasadena and horticulture chairwoman for the San Gabriel Mountains Chapter of the California Native Plant Society.

The bright yellow aphids found on milkweeds are destructive, non-native pests. It is important to remove and dispose of them at first appearance or they will quickly infest the plant, making it difficult for monarchs to use the plant.

Monarch eggs are more tightly attached to leaves than aphids, so with just the right amount of pressure you may be able to wash off aphids without destroying the eggs.

Sprayed water may only dislodge the pests, which can climb back up on their own or be returned by aphid-harvesting ants. Soapy water may dislodge and kill more aphids, but it also is more damaging to the monarchs and can build up on the plant.

Though tedious, dabbing aphids with cotton swabs dipped in isopropyl (rubbing) alcohol is most effective. That kills them outright. Alcohol, however, also is lethal to monarch eggs and larvae, so care must be taken when dabbing.

Natural controls for the pests, sometimes called oleander aphids, include the ladybug, especially in the larval stage, as well as the lacewing, syrphid fly larvae and the tiny wasp Lysiphlebus testaceipes. Some of these are available in stores and online.


Secret to killing milkweed aphids, not monarch butterfly eggs

Los Angeles reader Millicent Stoller wrote to our SoCal Garden Clinic saying she was trying to plant for monarch butterflies. Stoller said she was growing two milkweeds, but both had become inundated with aphids.

“When I try to eliminate the bugs with a water spray or a soap-water spray, I end up destroying butterfly eggs,” she wrote. “Is there another way?”

For an answer, we turned to Barbara Eisenstein, research associate at Rancho Santa Ana Botanic Garden in Claremont, founder and manager of a nature park stewardship program in South Pasadena and horticulture chairwoman for the San Gabriel Mountains Chapter of the California Native Plant Society.

The bright yellow aphids found on milkweeds are destructive, non-native pests. It is important to remove and dispose of them at first appearance or they will quickly infest the plant, making it difficult for monarchs to use the plant.

Monarch eggs are more tightly attached to leaves than aphids, so with just the right amount of pressure you may be able to wash off aphids without destroying the eggs.

Sprayed water may only dislodge the pests, which can climb back up on their own or be returned by aphid-harvesting ants. Soapy water may dislodge and kill more aphids, but it also is more damaging to the monarchs and can build up on the plant.

Though tedious, dabbing aphids with cotton swabs dipped in isopropyl (rubbing) alcohol is most effective. That kills them outright. Alcohol, however, also is lethal to monarch eggs and larvae, so care must be taken when dabbing.

Natural controls for the pests, sometimes called oleander aphids, include the ladybug, especially in the larval stage, as well as the lacewing, syrphid fly larvae and the tiny wasp Lysiphlebus testaceipes. Some of these are available in stores and online.


Secret to killing milkweed aphids, not monarch butterfly eggs

Los Angeles reader Millicent Stoller wrote to our SoCal Garden Clinic saying she was trying to plant for monarch butterflies. Stoller said she was growing two milkweeds, but both had become inundated with aphids.

“When I try to eliminate the bugs with a water spray or a soap-water spray, I end up destroying butterfly eggs,” she wrote. “Is there another way?”

For an answer, we turned to Barbara Eisenstein, research associate at Rancho Santa Ana Botanic Garden in Claremont, founder and manager of a nature park stewardship program in South Pasadena and horticulture chairwoman for the San Gabriel Mountains Chapter of the California Native Plant Society.

The bright yellow aphids found on milkweeds are destructive, non-native pests. It is important to remove and dispose of them at first appearance or they will quickly infest the plant, making it difficult for monarchs to use the plant.

Monarch eggs are more tightly attached to leaves than aphids, so with just the right amount of pressure you may be able to wash off aphids without destroying the eggs.

Sprayed water may only dislodge the pests, which can climb back up on their own or be returned by aphid-harvesting ants. Soapy water may dislodge and kill more aphids, but it also is more damaging to the monarchs and can build up on the plant.

Though tedious, dabbing aphids with cotton swabs dipped in isopropyl (rubbing) alcohol is most effective. That kills them outright. Alcohol, however, also is lethal to monarch eggs and larvae, so care must be taken when dabbing.

Natural controls for the pests, sometimes called oleander aphids, include the ladybug, especially in the larval stage, as well as the lacewing, syrphid fly larvae and the tiny wasp Lysiphlebus testaceipes. Some of these are available in stores and online.


Secret to killing milkweed aphids, not monarch butterfly eggs

Los Angeles reader Millicent Stoller wrote to our SoCal Garden Clinic saying she was trying to plant for monarch butterflies. Stoller said she was growing two milkweeds, but both had become inundated with aphids.

“When I try to eliminate the bugs with a water spray or a soap-water spray, I end up destroying butterfly eggs,” she wrote. “Is there another way?”

For an answer, we turned to Barbara Eisenstein, research associate at Rancho Santa Ana Botanic Garden in Claremont, founder and manager of a nature park stewardship program in South Pasadena and horticulture chairwoman for the San Gabriel Mountains Chapter of the California Native Plant Society.

The bright yellow aphids found on milkweeds are destructive, non-native pests. It is important to remove and dispose of them at first appearance or they will quickly infest the plant, making it difficult for monarchs to use the plant.

Monarch eggs are more tightly attached to leaves than aphids, so with just the right amount of pressure you may be able to wash off aphids without destroying the eggs.

Sprayed water may only dislodge the pests, which can climb back up on their own or be returned by aphid-harvesting ants. Soapy water may dislodge and kill more aphids, but it also is more damaging to the monarchs and can build up on the plant.

Though tedious, dabbing aphids with cotton swabs dipped in isopropyl (rubbing) alcohol is most effective. That kills them outright. Alcohol, however, also is lethal to monarch eggs and larvae, so care must be taken when dabbing.

Natural controls for the pests, sometimes called oleander aphids, include the ladybug, especially in the larval stage, as well as the lacewing, syrphid fly larvae and the tiny wasp Lysiphlebus testaceipes. Some of these are available in stores and online.


Secret to killing milkweed aphids, not monarch butterfly eggs

Los Angeles reader Millicent Stoller wrote to our SoCal Garden Clinic saying she was trying to plant for monarch butterflies. Stoller said she was growing two milkweeds, but both had become inundated with aphids.

“When I try to eliminate the bugs with a water spray or a soap-water spray, I end up destroying butterfly eggs,” she wrote. “Is there another way?”

For an answer, we turned to Barbara Eisenstein, research associate at Rancho Santa Ana Botanic Garden in Claremont, founder and manager of a nature park stewardship program in South Pasadena and horticulture chairwoman for the San Gabriel Mountains Chapter of the California Native Plant Society.

The bright yellow aphids found on milkweeds are destructive, non-native pests. It is important to remove and dispose of them at first appearance or they will quickly infest the plant, making it difficult for monarchs to use the plant.

Monarch eggs are more tightly attached to leaves than aphids, so with just the right amount of pressure you may be able to wash off aphids without destroying the eggs.

Sprayed water may only dislodge the pests, which can climb back up on their own or be returned by aphid-harvesting ants. Soapy water may dislodge and kill more aphids, but it also is more damaging to the monarchs and can build up on the plant.

Though tedious, dabbing aphids with cotton swabs dipped in isopropyl (rubbing) alcohol is most effective. That kills them outright. Alcohol, however, also is lethal to monarch eggs and larvae, so care must be taken when dabbing.

Natural controls for the pests, sometimes called oleander aphids, include the ladybug, especially in the larval stage, as well as the lacewing, syrphid fly larvae and the tiny wasp Lysiphlebus testaceipes. Some of these are available in stores and online.


Secret to killing milkweed aphids, not monarch butterfly eggs

Los Angeles reader Millicent Stoller wrote to our SoCal Garden Clinic saying she was trying to plant for monarch butterflies. Stoller said she was growing two milkweeds, but both had become inundated with aphids.

“When I try to eliminate the bugs with a water spray or a soap-water spray, I end up destroying butterfly eggs,” she wrote. “Is there another way?”

For an answer, we turned to Barbara Eisenstein, research associate at Rancho Santa Ana Botanic Garden in Claremont, founder and manager of a nature park stewardship program in South Pasadena and horticulture chairwoman for the San Gabriel Mountains Chapter of the California Native Plant Society.

The bright yellow aphids found on milkweeds are destructive, non-native pests. It is important to remove and dispose of them at first appearance or they will quickly infest the plant, making it difficult for monarchs to use the plant.

Monarch eggs are more tightly attached to leaves than aphids, so with just the right amount of pressure you may be able to wash off aphids without destroying the eggs.

Sprayed water may only dislodge the pests, which can climb back up on their own or be returned by aphid-harvesting ants. Soapy water may dislodge and kill more aphids, but it also is more damaging to the monarchs and can build up on the plant.

Though tedious, dabbing aphids with cotton swabs dipped in isopropyl (rubbing) alcohol is most effective. That kills them outright. Alcohol, however, also is lethal to monarch eggs and larvae, so care must be taken when dabbing.

Natural controls for the pests, sometimes called oleander aphids, include the ladybug, especially in the larval stage, as well as the lacewing, syrphid fly larvae and the tiny wasp Lysiphlebus testaceipes. Some of these are available in stores and online.


Secret to killing milkweed aphids, not monarch butterfly eggs

Los Angeles reader Millicent Stoller wrote to our SoCal Garden Clinic saying she was trying to plant for monarch butterflies. Stoller said she was growing two milkweeds, but both had become inundated with aphids.

“When I try to eliminate the bugs with a water spray or a soap-water spray, I end up destroying butterfly eggs,” she wrote. “Is there another way?”

For an answer, we turned to Barbara Eisenstein, research associate at Rancho Santa Ana Botanic Garden in Claremont, founder and manager of a nature park stewardship program in South Pasadena and horticulture chairwoman for the San Gabriel Mountains Chapter of the California Native Plant Society.

The bright yellow aphids found on milkweeds are destructive, non-native pests. It is important to remove and dispose of them at first appearance or they will quickly infest the plant, making it difficult for monarchs to use the plant.

Monarch eggs are more tightly attached to leaves than aphids, so with just the right amount of pressure you may be able to wash off aphids without destroying the eggs.

Sprayed water may only dislodge the pests, which can climb back up on their own or be returned by aphid-harvesting ants. Soapy water may dislodge and kill more aphids, but it also is more damaging to the monarchs and can build up on the plant.

Though tedious, dabbing aphids with cotton swabs dipped in isopropyl (rubbing) alcohol is most effective. That kills them outright. Alcohol, however, also is lethal to monarch eggs and larvae, so care must be taken when dabbing.

Natural controls for the pests, sometimes called oleander aphids, include the ladybug, especially in the larval stage, as well as the lacewing, syrphid fly larvae and the tiny wasp Lysiphlebus testaceipes. Some of these are available in stores and online.


Secret to killing milkweed aphids, not monarch butterfly eggs

Los Angeles reader Millicent Stoller wrote to our SoCal Garden Clinic saying she was trying to plant for monarch butterflies. Stoller said she was growing two milkweeds, but both had become inundated with aphids.

“When I try to eliminate the bugs with a water spray or a soap-water spray, I end up destroying butterfly eggs,” she wrote. “Is there another way?”

For an answer, we turned to Barbara Eisenstein, research associate at Rancho Santa Ana Botanic Garden in Claremont, founder and manager of a nature park stewardship program in South Pasadena and horticulture chairwoman for the San Gabriel Mountains Chapter of the California Native Plant Society.

The bright yellow aphids found on milkweeds are destructive, non-native pests. It is important to remove and dispose of them at first appearance or they will quickly infest the plant, making it difficult for monarchs to use the plant.

Monarch eggs are more tightly attached to leaves than aphids, so with just the right amount of pressure you may be able to wash off aphids without destroying the eggs.

Sprayed water may only dislodge the pests, which can climb back up on their own or be returned by aphid-harvesting ants. Soapy water may dislodge and kill more aphids, but it also is more damaging to the monarchs and can build up on the plant.

Though tedious, dabbing aphids with cotton swabs dipped in isopropyl (rubbing) alcohol is most effective. That kills them outright. Alcohol, however, also is lethal to monarch eggs and larvae, so care must be taken when dabbing.

Natural controls for the pests, sometimes called oleander aphids, include the ladybug, especially in the larval stage, as well as the lacewing, syrphid fly larvae and the tiny wasp Lysiphlebus testaceipes. Some of these are available in stores and online.


Watch the video: Ρεπορτάζ Φως στο Τούνελ. Είχα εγώ ραντεβού με τον Γραικό; (July 2022).


Comments:

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